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The Engineer: Common Misconceptions About Computer Engineers



Hey Guys! This week we're talking about common misconceptions about our respective fields some of the frequently asked questions that I've gotten over the course of these past few years.

Computer Engineers fix computers.

Okay so a lot of computer engineering majors do know how to fix computers, but we didn't go to school for that. Computer Engineering focuses on how to design and build hardware and software components of a computer. Yes, we may be a little bit more technically inclined, but that's definitely not our specialty.

Computer Engineers only work at tech companies.

I work in the financial services industry on a team comprised of engineers. Every company needs engineers either as the forefront of their business or as support for the business especially as technology keeps advancing and the world is becoming more connected. One reason why I liked my major is because I knew that I could work in any industry that I wanted. A lot of my interests are relatively interdisciplinary and computer engineering serves as a good leverage for any of my future endeavors.

Computer Engineers only sit in front of a computer and code.

Although a lot of engineers do sit in front of a desk and code, complex problems are usually solved through the exchanging of ideas. In a corporate setting, you have meetings where you need to understand the requirements and you are working on a team. To be successful in industry, you not only need to have the technical skill, but also be able to communicate. Being able to communicate your thoughts and ideas is key.

So there you have it, friends. Computer Engineering is pretty cool and anyone can do it, be successful, and find their own little niche.

- The Engineer

#Blackwomenengineers #BlackStemLikeMe #BlackGirlMagic #ComputerEngineering #Womenengineers

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